The most expensive homes in the world

Most people take pride in their home and often work hard to keep it looking as nice as possible. For most of us, that’s a job we can handle with little or no help from others, but for some homeowners, maintaining their own home and keeping up with all the chores would be nearly impossible. These are the homes of the super-rich, the most expensive homes in the entire world. Large homes are nice, but these properties are truly extreme, and might cause one to wonder how someone can actually live in a home that is closer in size to an office building or warehouse. How “homey” can a huge house be? That, presumably, is a matter of opinion, and perhaps it is safe to assume that the owners of these extreme homes find them “homey” enough for their taste. Of all the many millions of homes on the face of the planet, these are the most expensive of all.

1. Buckingham Palace – $1.55 Billion

buckingham-palace

Image Source: [Duncan]

The price tag on this historic and very prestigious residence reflects the kind of money we usually associate with the price of an aircraft carrier or perhaps a stealth bomber aircraft. Buckingham Palace was built in 1703 and was planned as a “large townhouse” for the Duke of Buckingham. Their definition of “large” is obviously just a bit understated! As most people probably know, it is now the official residence of the British Royal Family when they are in London. This colossal home has a total of 775 rooms, and that includes 188 staff rooms, 52 bedrooms, 92 offices, 78 bathrooms, and 19 state rooms. It’s probably safe to say that there has never been any competition for bathroom space among those who spent time growing up there!

2. Antilla – $1 Billion

This impressive homestead located in Mumbai, India would actually be the envy of some office buildings due to the amount of space it contains! This 27-storey residence occupies around 400,000 square feet, boasts a total of six underground parking levels and three helicopter pads. A staff of 600 is responsible for keeping this gigantic home clean, well-maintained and operating smoothly. The owner is Mukesh Ambani, who happens to own the second-most valuable company in all of India, Reliance Industries, which is involved with energy production.

3. Villa Leapolda – $750 Million

No one can say that King Leopold II of Belgium didn’t know how treat his mistresses, since he actually had this lavish home constructed for one of them! This massive home is currently owned by Lily Safra, a Brazilian socialite and noted philanthropist. Villa Leapolda is located in the French town of Villefranche-sur-Mer on the French Riviera. The home is situated on ten exquisitely manicured acres and features gardens that require a staff of 50 to properly maintain. This home is also somewhat of a movie star, having been featured in the Alfred Hitchcock movie To Catch A Thief.

4. Four Fairfield Pond – $248.5 Million

This may be the ultimate example of luxury and self-sufficiency since this property has its very own power plant. It boasts 29 bedrooms, 39 bathrooms, a bowling alley, tennis courts, squash courts, a basketball court, a dining room that is over 90 feet in length, three swimming pools, and more than 100,000 square feet of interior space. It sits on a generous 63 acres or property in Sagaponack, New York and is owned by Ira Rennert, a business man and successful investor who has interests in metals, mining, industrial fixtures, and manufacturing.

5. 18-19 Kensington Palace Gardens – $222 Million

Back we go again to Great Britain for the low-down on the fifth-most expensive home in the world. This London estate is located on a street that is known as Billionaires Row and boasts neighbors like Prince William and Kate Middleton. This residence is currently owned by Indian billionaire Laksmi Mittal, the top executive of the world’s largest steel manufacturing company. The home features 12 bedrooms, an indoor swimming pool, Turkish baths and sufficient parking for 20 automobiles. Mittal purchased the home from Formula 1 racing chief executive Bernie Ecclestone.

6. Ellison Estate – $200 Million

Those who follow the technology industry probably recognize the name of this property as the one that’s owned by Oracle co-founder and chairman Larry Ellison. Located on 23 acres in Woodside, California, it features a total of ten buildings, a tea house, bath house, koi pond, and a man-made lake. Construction was definitely not rushed during the nine years it took to complete this estate. Ellison was once listed as the third richest man in the United States and owns numerous other properties in the areas around Lake Tahoe and Malibu.

7. Hearst Castle – $191 Million

This majestic residence in San Simeon, California may be recognizable to many as one that was featured in the movie The Godfather. It has also hosted it’s fair share of dignitaries including Former President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie, Bob Hope, Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Winston Churchill, and Franklin Roosevelt. Although the former owner of the 27-room estate, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearts has passed away, the property remains in the hands of his trustees. It is now regarded as a heritage and tourist site through an agreement between the California Park System and the Hearst Estate.

8. Seven The Pinnacle – $155 Million

Although the location of this luxury property might be considered a bit out-of-the-way by most, it’s not lacking in the kinds of amenities that the rich and famous are accustomed to. This is the largest property located in the Yellowstone Club, a private ski and golf resort for billionaires. Since winters get pretty cold in Montana, the residence features heated floors throughout to prevent guest’s feet from getting cold. There is also a large wine cellar, bathrooms that feature their own fireplaces, a gym, a ski-lift, and indoor and outdoor swimming pools. After going bankrupt in 2008 due to mismanagement, the resort property was sold to American real estate developer and record producer Tim Blixseth and his wife.

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